Learning more about vampire fish: first report of candiru attached to an Amazonian thorny catfish

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  • September 10, 2021
  • For the first time, scientists report a vampire fish attached to the body of an Amazonian thorny catfish. Very unusually, the candirus were attached close to the lateral bone plates, rather than the gills, where they are normally found. Since the hosts were not badly harmed, and the candirus apparently derived no food benefit, scientists believe this association is commensalistic rather than parasitic. The research is published in the open-access journal Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria.

    The mini grasshoppers that outlived dinosaurs: the fascinating world of Tetrigidae

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  • September 8, 2021
  • Have you ever seen a one-centimetre-long jumping critter in a leaflitter or close to a pond or a stream and thought that it is some juvenile insect? What you saw was probably an adult pygmy grasshopper, member of the family Tetrigidae. There are more than 2000 described species of those minute jumping insects, and this peculiar family has been around for more than 230 million years, meaninng that pygmies said both ‘hi’ and ‘bye’ to dinosaurs. And yet, we know more about dinosaurs than we do about pygmy grasshoppers.

    Guest blog post: New tardigrade species honours Eurovision Song Contest winner

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  • May 31, 2021
  • Alexander Rybak. Photo by NRK P3 under a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license.

    guest blog post by Matteo Vecchi One of the main threats to biodiversity conservation is not recognizing the uniqueness of species – without a formal name, a species cannot be protected properly. Tardigrades – microorganisms also known as water bears or moss piglets – are no exception. When we were faced with two new species, […]

    To combat global change, scientists must prioritize community partnerships

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  • May 20, 2021
  • Guest blog post by Kennedy “Ned” Rubert-Nason, Caitlin Mandeville and Kirsten Schwarz Global change is an immediate, accelerating threat to humanity, and its impacts are perpetuated by human activities. Changes such as climate warming, landscape alteration, pollution, resource extraction and depletion, extreme events, biodiversity loss, and spreading of invasive species including diseases, threaten the natural […]

    Curvature values, a new aspect in the morphology of grapevine seeds

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  • May 12, 2021
  • Guest blog post by Dr Emilio Cervantes Grape seeds have a characteristic oval or pear-like shape. It has been long recognised that this form is variable, and that, in general, wild-type seeds are smaller and more rounded, while the seeds of cultivated varieties tend to be more elongated in one side, or pear-shaped. Recently, seeds […]

    Why we shouldn’t blame women for gender disparity in science: Perspectives of women in zoology

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  • March 25, 2021
  • A Brazilian network of female zoologists aims to oppose gender disparity in science Guest blog post by Veronica Slobodian Scientists are part of a rather sexist society and, therefore, ruled by a rather sexist social conduct. Nevertheless, women scientists attempt to thrive despite all setbacks provided by structural sexism (both explicit and implicit).  Sadly, female […]

    Failure to respond to a coral disease epizootic in Florida: causes and consequences

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  • January 26, 2021
  • By 2020, losses of corals have been observed throughout Florida and into the greater Caribbean basin in what turned out to be likely the most lethal recorded case of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease. A Perspectives paper, published in the open-access peer-reviewed journal Rethinking Ecology, provides an overview of how Florida ended up in a situation, where the best that could be done is rescuing genetic material from coral species at risk of regional extinction.

    Data checking for biodiversity collections and other biodiversity data compilers from Pensoft

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  • October 21, 2020
  • Guest blog post by Dr Robert Mesibov Proofreading the text of scientific papers isn’t hard, although it can be tedious. Are all the words spelled correctly? Is all the punctuation correct and in the right place? Is the writing clear and concise, with correct grammar? Are all the cited references listed in the References section, […]

    Guest Blog Post: Researchers split the birdcatcher trees (genus Pisonia) into three

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  • July 7, 2020
  • Guest blog post by Marcos Caraballo The birdcatcher trees – genus Pisonia – are infamous for trapping birds with their super-sticky seed pods that would frequently entangle the body of the ‘victim’. Left flightless, the poor feathered creatures eventually die either from starvation or fatigue, or predators. Similarly notorious are the birdcatcher trees for botanists, […]

    Guest Blog Post: New Area of Importance for Bat Conservation in Honduras

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  • March 24, 2020
  • The recognition of the “Ceguaca, la Mujer de los Juncos” locality comes as a result of research work – published last year in Subterranean Biology – which produced the first checklist of bats for Santa Bárbara Guest blog post by Eduardo Javier Ordoñez-Trejo and Manfredo Alejandro Turcios-Casco Bat populations are threatened due to fragmentation and […]