Three new species of zoantharians described from coral reefs across the Indo-Pacific

  • January 5, 2018
  • One of them was named after the president of Palau, Tommy Remengesau, in honour of his and the nation’s support to the authors and marine conservation Three new species of zoantharians were discovered by researchers from the University of the Ryukyus and Kagoshima University, Japan, and the Palau International Coral Reef Center. Despite not being previously known, all three […]

    Special issue: Natura 2000 appropriate assessment and derogation procedure

  • December 19, 2017
  • The focus is on the case-law of the European Court of Justice and the German Federal Administrative Court With over 27,500 sites, Natura 2000 is the greatest nature conservation network in the world. It covers more than 18 percent of the land area in the European Union and around 395,000 km2 of its marine territory. Projects and […]

    Conservation and nameless earthworms: Assessors in the dark?

  • May 22, 2017
  • Species that live exclusively in a single region are at a particular risk of extinction. However, for them to be protected, thorough assessments of the environmental impacts need to be performed. There are more than 100 earthworm species living in the soil and dead wood of KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. Most of them live exclusively […]

    American scientists discover the first Antarctic ground beetle

  • November 28, 2016
  • Fossilised forewings from two individuals, discovered on the Beardmore Glacier, revealed the first ground beetle known from the southernmost continent. It is also the second beetle for the Antarctic insect fauna with living descendants. The new species, which for now is also the sole representative of a new genus, is to be commonly known as […]

    People can simultaneously give a hand to endangered apes and stay at safe distance

  • October 12, 2016
  • Primates claim the highest proportion of endangered species among all mammals, according to the IUCN Red List. Yet, the substantial conservation interference from humans, which is already in place, could itself lead to even greater losses. Plenty of studies have proven that while researchers and ecotourists raise vital for ape conservation knowledge and funds, it […]

    Tracing the ancestry of dung beetles

  • April 25, 2016
  • One of the largest and most important groups of dung beetles in the world evolved from a single common ancestor and relationships among the various lineages are now known, according to new research by an entomologist from Western Kentucky University. The study by Dr T. Keith Philips, recently published in the open access journal ZooKeys, […]

    Poorly known South African mountain endemic appears to be a very valuable keystone species

  • April 21, 2016
  • Mountain ecosystems are valuable providers of key resources including water. These ecosystems comprise diverse species, some of which appear to be especially important to the ecosystem’s functioning. In poorly studied mountain environments in biodiversity-rich countries, these keystone species can often be overlooked and undervalued. Macowania is a group of yellow daisy shrubs occurring in the […]