All articles published in Pensoft journals at your fingertips with the Researcher app

Following a recent integration with the novel, social network-style research discovery app Researcher, the scholarly platform ARPHA has taken yet another step to ensure scholarly publications from across its open-access, peer-reviewed journal portfolio are as easy to find and read as possible. Now, research papers published in all Pensoft’s and all other journals hosted on ARPHA Platform can reach the 1.8 million current users of Researcher directly on their smartphones.

Following a recent integration with the novel, social network-style research discovery app Researcher, the scholarly publishing platform ARPHA has taken yet another step to ensure scholarly publications from across its open-access, peer-reviewed journal portfolio are as easy to find and read as possible. Now, research papers published in all Pensoft’s, as well as all other journals hosted on ARPHA, can reach the 1.8 million current users of Researcher directly on their screens.

Similarly to the world’s best known and used social media networks: Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, Researcher allows its users, scientists and academics, to follow their favourite scholarly journals and topics, in order to receive their content in a personalised newsfeed format, either on their phones or computers. Thus, they can stay up to date with the latest research in their scientific fields by simply scrolling down: much like what they are already used to in their everyday life outside academia. 

Similarly to the well-known social network apps, Researcher lets users bookmark papers to go back to later on and even invite friends to join the platform. Furthermore, the users can also synchronise their accounts with their ORCID iDs, in order to load their own papers on their profiles on Researcher. 

The Researcher app fetches new publications from all indexed journals several times a day, thus ensuring that a user’s newsfeed is updated in almost real time. Now, the ARPHA-hosted journals have joined the 17,000 academic outlets from across the sciences already sharing their publications on the app.

“At Pensoft, we are perfectly aware that good and open science practices go far beyond cost-free access to research articles. In reality, Open Science is also about easier findability and reusability, that is the probability one stumbles across a particular research publication, and consequently, cite and build on the findings in his/her own studies. By indexing our journals with Researcher, we’re further facilitating the discoverability of their content to the benefit of the authors who trust us with their work,”

says ARPHA’s and Pensoft’s founder and CEO Prof. Lyubomir Penev.

“We share ARPHA’s belief that Open Science means more than just free access – it means giving scholarly and scientific content the best chance to get in front the right reader at the right time. Our mission is to make sure that scientists and researchers never miss vital research. This partnership will ensure that distribution to our users across the world is built into the ARPHA platform – boosting discoverability and smoothing the path to impact,”

adds Olly Cooper, CEO of Researcher.

Follow ARPHA on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Celebration time: ZooKeys releases its 600th issue


zookeys 600 coverWith what already sounds like an annual tradition at this time of the year, we are delighted to announce yet another milestone that
ZooKeys just reached. Our 600th issue is now out and we are just as proud with it as we were exactly five years and a month ago, when we printed out our first three-digit issue number on a ZooKeys cover.

However, we feel nowhere near getting tired of counting pages, covers and issues, nor do we believe this will ever going to happen. Quite the contrary, every year we take more and more pleasure in adding new achievements next to the name of ZooKeys and Pensoft.   

Last year was no exception. During the past 13 months, we published a total of 673 articles, including research findings spectacular enough to reach out to not only the zoological fellowship, but to the wide audience from around the world. While our Impact Factor keeps on increasing, according to the figures Thomson Reuters released last week, we are gratified to observe our progressively growing impact on both the scholarly and the popular-science front.

Thanks to the discoveries, which found a suiting publication partner in ZooKeys, our authors and us made a lot of big headlines in outlets such as National Geographic, Science, CNN, BBC, Sky News, New York Times, Deutsche Welle, Der Standard, DR, Washington Post, Fox News, Huffington Post, The Guardian, NBC News, and a lot more. We had a bit of everything: record-breakers, species given mystic or splashy names and others bearing nerdy ones. Together, we also gave public voice to serious conservation issues, calling for immediate action.

Last June, we introduced you to the Hades centipede, known to be the world’s deepest-dwelling species of its kind. Who knew that the entrance to the Underworld is located in a Croatian cave?

Later on, in November, published with us snail species Acmella nana broke the World record for the tiniest land snail. Moreover, this happened only about a month after we published the previous ‘prizewinner’ Angustopila dominikae, and that one was already tiny enough to fit 10 of its shells within the eye of a needle at the very same time!  

Our pages, which have been and always will be openly available to read for anyone who is online, were also the first to let you know about the existence of the Johnny Cash tarantula, the (Edward) Snowden crayfish, the two daddy longlegs: Smeagol and the ‘Master-of-the-crypt’ Behemoth, the Chewbacca beetle and the Brad Pitt wasp, among many others.

About two months ago, graduate student Madhu Chetri spotted the ancient Himalayan woolly wolf in Nepal. The new knowledge about the beautiful and, sadly, Critically Endangered carnivore, which he acquired, will hopefully help in preventing its otherwise imminent extinction.

In the meantime, Deutsche Welle (DW) featured our Zorro fish along with the eight-legged Johnny Cash’s namesake in their rank list of the 7 “newcomer” species of the year.

While being in the spotlight is definitely a gratifying feeling, we also indulge in our successes achieved far from the eyes of the public, although we are certain that our authors will be just as excited to hear about. Such an accomplishment is our recently sealed partnership with open digital repository Zenodo, who are helping us, along with the rest of the journals, published by Pensoft, to keep our research findings safe and easily accessible by archiving all our articles in both PDF and XML format on the date of publication.

However, let’s not forget that nothing of all the above would be what it is without our authors, editors and reviewers, who have always done their best to keep ZooKeys at the World’s top open access academic journals. We’d especially like to thank our Most active authors, editors and reviewers for being substantial part of ZooKeys.

Introducing the ARPHA Writing Tool

The former Pensoft Writing Tool (PWT) appears under a new name with exciting functionalities customized to your needs

It’s been almost two full years since we first launched the Pensoft Writing Tool (PWT) as the first ever workflow that supports the full life cycle of a manuscript, from authoring, to peer-review, publishing and dissemination. Now it is time to move a step forward with an updated tool that incorporates all our accumulated experience and your invaluable feedback. PWT is now transforming into ARPHA Writing Tool (AWT) – a rebrand that means much more than a change of name and design.

So, what is so cool about the new ARPHA Writing tool? Here it is:

  • New modern outlook and user-friendly design
  • All editing happens in the manuscript preview mode
  • Plug-in for mathematical formulas
  • Pre-submission technical validation, by automated tool and humans
  • Pre-submission external peer-review
  • Importing manuscripts through Application Programming Interface (API)

Those of you who have been using the PWT remember the two writing modes – Preview and Editing. Over the past two years, we’ve learned that this might sometimes be tricky. With the AWT, there will be no more flipping between modes. The tool now contains only one editing mode – this means rich editing functions and direct visualisation of your changes and comments straight into the the article preview.

Besides, the AWT will take a step beyond biodiversity data publishing towards providing a large set of predefined, yet flexible article templates to allow the publication of most types of research outcomes. As the scope is broadening, we also strive to simplify and improve the user experience.

The AWT is all about user-friendliness. With the new intuitive design and more comprehensible functions, the system is fast to navigate and get used to. While making every effort to improve user experience, we made sure functions are straightforward and easy to discover.

awt-screen-shot (2)The AWT makes collaborative work on a manuscript with co-authors or peers easier than ever. Mentors, pre-submission reviewers, linguistic or copy editors can now contribute to the manuscript side by side. The collaborative peer-review process provides easy communication thanks to a track-change function, comments and replies, as well as automated, but customisable email and social network notification tools.

The tool also provides authors with a two-step technical validation – the manuscript is examined for consistency automatically by the system, followed by a second check from our staff ahead of publication. After an article is published, the AWT also offers easy republication of updated article versions via the authoring tool.

Perhaps the most innovative feature of AWT, however, is the new functionality to invite reviewers still during the authoring process. This function is still globally unique as it allows the authors to discuss manuscripts with their peers before submission, and consequently to submit the reviews together with the manuscript. In case the editor approves the manuscript for publication based on the pre-submission review(s), the manuscript can be published just a few days after submission.

Go to the AWT now and test it yourself: http://pwt.pensoft.net/